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In The News

Georgians for a Healthy Future is frequently cited in news articles about health care issues, ensuring the consumer perspective is heard. Read news stories featuring Georgians for a Healthy Future’s perspective below.

2023

Georgia Medicaid program with work requirement off to slow start even as thousands lose coverage

  • by Sudhin Thanawala
  • Associated Press
“We’ve chosen a much more complicated and lengthy process that will take a long time even for the few folks who get coverage,” said Laura Colbert, executive director of the advocacy group Georgians for a Healthy Future.
See the article for the full details

100,000 Georgians Lost Medicaid Coverage Last Month

  • Flag Pole

The state’s publicly released information for the unwinding has not included a breakdown for how many enrollees going through the process each month are children.  “These disenrolled individuals are likely children and parents in very low-income households, those living in unstable housing, and children who move between parents, grandparents and other family members for care,” said Laura Colbert, executive director of Georgians for a Healthy Future, which is a nonprofit patient advocacy group. “It is very likely that the majority of these kids are still eligible for Medicaid coverage but may not find out until they visit the doctor, try to fill a prescription, or have an emergency.”

There was also a notable decline last month in the rate of automatic renewals, which are done with data the state already has access to—like payroll or unemployment data—and does not require the Medicaid enrollee to do anything. The rate went from nearly 49% in May to about 23% last month. “This data includes some very troubling signs for Georgia families,” Colbert said of the monthly data. “The combination of low automatic renewals and very high disenrollments means that eligible kids and families are losing their Medicaid coverage unnecessarily.”

See the article for the full details

Nearly 100,000 Georgians lost health insurance in early days of Medicaid unwinding

  • by Rebecca Grapevine
  • Atlanta Business Chroncile

“This data includes some very troubling signs for Georgia families,” said Laura Colbert, executive director of Georgians for a Healthy Future.

See the article for the full details

Nearly 100,000 low-income Georgians lost Medicaid health coverage last month

  • by Jill Nolin
  • Georgia Recorder

“These disenrolled individuals are likely children and parents in very low-income households, those living in unstable housing, and children who move between parents, grandparents, and other family members for care,” said Laura Colbert, executive director of Georgians for a Healthy Future, which is a nonprofit patient advocacy group.

“It is very likely that the majority of these kids are still eligible for Medicaid coverage but may not find out until they visit the doctor, try to fill a prescription, or have an emergency,” Colbert said.

There was also a notable decline last month in the rate of automatic renewals, which are done with data the state already has access to – like payroll or unemployment data – and does not require the Medicaid enrollee to do anything. The rate went from nearly 49% in May to about 23% last month.

“This data includes some very troubling signs for Georgia families,” Colbert said of the monthly data released Wednesday. “The combination of low automatic renewals and very high disenrollments means that eligible kids and families are losing their Medicaid coverage unnecessarily.”

See the article for the full details

Your Medicaid and PeachCare Kids eligibility may have changed

  • by Mackenzie Petrie
  • WALB News

“There will be far fewer uninsured folks as a result of this Medicaid renewal process in the states with Medicaid expansion,” said Laura Colbert, Executive Director of Georgians for a Healthy Future. “Georgia is not one of those, so we will see very large coverage losses.”

See the article for the full details

Georgia takes on health insurance market under new law

  • WABE

The state market will be different than what Kemp originally planned. He wanted to put insurance deals in the hands of private brokers who could sell policies with the insurance package required by the Affordable Care Act as well as policies with lower benefits. Those measures might have been cheaper, but Laura Colbert, executive director of Georgians for a Healthy Future, said they would have been worse for consumers.

“That really would have taken Georgia back to the bad old days where insurers really gave consumers a head start and it was incredibly difficult to compare plans,” Colbert said, calling Kemp’s original plan a “non-marketplace.”

See the article for the full details

Why Georgia’s Medicaid work requirements are a crucial test case

  • by Nathaniel Weixel
  • The Hill

“What we know is that in Georgia, more than 400,000 Georgians would be covered if the state expanded Medicaid,” said Laura Colbert, director at Georgians for a Healthy Future.

See the article for the full details

Limited Medicaid expansion covering low-income Georgians starts July 1

  • by Jill Nolin
  • The Current GA

“The reason that there’s such a gap between those who will gain coverage and those who are potentially eligible is because this program really overloads people with paperwork,” said Laura Colbert, executive director of Georgians for a Health Future.

“It is a paperwork requirement rather than a work and community engagement requirement,” she said.

See the article for the full details

Limited Georgia Medicaid expansion launches this weekend

  • by Dave Williams
  • Capitol Beat News Service

“Any program that doesn’t cover all 400,000 to 450,000 [uninsured] Georgians falls short of what Georgia needs,” said Laura Colbert, executive director of Georgians for a Healthy Future.

See the article for the full details

Limited Medicaid expansion covering low-income Georgians begins in July

  • by Jill Nolin
  • Georgia Recorder

“The reason that there’s such a gap between those who will gain coverage and those who are potentially eligible is because this program really overloads people with paperwork,” said Laura Colbert, executive director of Georgians for a Health Future.

“It is a paperwork requirement rather than a work and community engagement requirement,” she said.

See the article for the full details