2014 Legislative Guides now available!

Ready to speak out for the health care issues you care about but not sure how to navigate the Georgia Legislature? Our Consumer Health Advocate’s Guide to the 2014 Georgia Legislative Session  is hot off the press and can be a resource for you! The guide includes contact information for legislators, state officials, health care organizations and associations, and the media. You may also request hard copies of the guide for yourself or your volunteers by contacting Georgians for a Healthy Future’s Outreach and Advocacy Director at aptashkin@healthyfuturega.org.
Ready to speak out for the health care issues you care about but not sure how to navigate the Georgia Legislature? Below, please find an overview of the legislative process in Georgia to help you become an effective advocate for your cause. You can also download our Consumer Health Advocate’s Guide to the 2014 Georgia Legislative Session, which contains all of this information and more, including contact information for legislators, state officials, health care organizations and associations, and the media. You may also request a hard copy of the guide by contacting Georgians for a Healthy Future’s Outreach and Advocacy Director. – See more at: http://healthyfuturega.org/advocacy/navigating-the-georgia-legislature#sthash.11OVuUdq.dpuf

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Flexibility in the Affordable Care Act: A Georgia Opportunity

Thanks to Carolyn Ingram from the Center for Health Care Strategies for serving as the keynote speaker for Georgians for a Healthy Future’s 4th annual Health Care Unscrambled policy breakfast event! Carolyn’s presentation described opportunities for flexibility with respect to the Medicaid program and provided illuminating examples from a handful of states taking innovative approaches. Carolyn’s presentation is available here.

 

 

 


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GHF in today’s AJC!

The following opinion piece by Georgians for a Healthy Future’s Executive Director Cindy Zeldin originally appeared in today’s Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 

Large majorities of young adults say they need and value health insurance, yet people in this age group are far more likely to be uninsured than children, seniors or older adults. Thirty-five percent of Georgians between 18 and 34 are uninsured. How can something so important be so elusive?

 

Until now, the health insurance of millenials had largely been neglected by public policy, leaving them with few options that provided adequate benefits at an affordable cost.

 

Most Americans get health insurance as a workplace benefit. They get a substantial employer contribution and receive these benefits on a pre-tax basis. Today’s young adults, however, are entering the job market in a tough economy. They are less likely to land jobs with health insurance. They often cobble together internships and part-time work to gain experience and make ends meet. For too many young adults, there simply has been no viable pathway to coverage.

 

The tide is turning. An estimated 3.1 million young adults nationwide — and 123,000 here in Georgia — have gained coverage as a direct result of an Affordable Care Act provision that allows parents to keep their children on policies up to age 26. This popular and effective public policy change was just a first step. The new health insurance exchanges will provide options for young adults who previously had nowhere to go.

 

These plans provide decent benefits and, in many cases, access to tax credits to make them affordable. The tax credits, available to individuals with annual incomes between $11,490 and $45,960, can be taken either at the time health insurance is purchased or at tax time. Some moderate-income individuals also can get help with out-of-pocket expenses.

 

For millenials who had been underwhelmed with the health insurance options available to them in the past, this is a breath of fresh air. For example, maternity coverage had been nearly impossible to secure in the Georgia non-group market for young couples ready to start a family. Now, this important benefit will be available.

 

While it is true some young adults enrolled in old plans may see higher premiums, many of those old plans didn’t provide adequate protection. Further, young adults who had a pre-existing chronic helath condition were locked out of the market entirely, a practice insurance companies must discontinue.

 

 The private insurance plans available through the exchanges won’t meet the needs of all young adults in Georgia. Those who have incomes that place them below the poverty line will likely remain uninsured unless Georgia expands its Medicaid program.

 

Most young adults want what Americans of all ages want: the peace of mind that comes with knowing that an unexpected cancer diagnosis or accident doesn’t equal financial ruin, and that they have access to basic medical services. The new coverage options are finally leveling the playing field for this generation. It’s about time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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GHF In The News
Dec 11, 2017
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