Georgia Unable to Climb out of the Bottom 10 States in Child Well-being

By Taifa Butler


Every summer when the Annie E. Casey Foundation releases its national KIDS COUNT Data Book, which profiles the status of children in all 50 states, I give an account of Georgia’s children. It’s a tale filled with promise yet overshadowed by unrelenting challenges for us all. Georgia’s children are better off than they were since the first publication of the Data Book 21 years ago, but we have a long way to go to improve health outcomes for our kids.


The 2010 KIDS COUNT Data Book ranks Georgia 42 out of 50 states on 10 critical areas related to health, safety, education, and employment. Georgia has historically ranked in the bottom ten states. For the past three years we’ve teetered between 41 and 43. Some would say we’ve hit a plateau, while our evaluators tell us that to break out of the bottom—we were ranked 50th in the first report—is a phenomenal feat given Georgia’s context.


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Is It Worth $10 to Save a Life?

By Benjamin Nanes

This November, Georgians will vote on adding a $10 fee to vehicle registrations, to be directed toward trauma care.  Or is it a tax?  If you listen to the pundits and politicians, the fee versus tax debate defines the referendum.  But they’re wrong; nothing could be less relevant.  Georgia needs dedicated funding for a trauma care system that will save lives and help the state’s economy, not a petty debate over what constitutes a “fee” or a “tax.”  The question is simple.  Is it worth $10 to save a life?  The answer should be simple too. (more…)


Battle for Smoke-free Savannah Heats Up

By June Deen
American Lung Association in Georgia


Under the umbrella of Healthy Savannah, several organizations including the American Lung Association, the American Cancer Society, and the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids are leading the charge to enact a local smoke-free ordinance in Savannah.  The Savannah City Council has begun public discussion on the Healthy Savannah proposal to make all workplaces and places open to the public smoke-free.  Council members plan two public meetings before the introduction and first reading on August 12.

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